My Writing Process blog tour

The lovely and talented S.J. Maylee asked me if I wanted to participate in a writing process blog hop. Being the type A attention slut that I am, I said yes please.

Of course, then I actually had to write a cogent and intelligent post on my writing process. Also being a huge smartass, I was tempted to leave you with the writing process I posted to my Twitter account (inspired by Chuck Wendig):

  1. Got an idea
  2. I hate outlining.
  3. Oh, God, I suck at everything.
  4. FINISH IT.
  5. Finally — OOH. Got an idea.

But cooler heads prevailed. So here are my answers to the following five questions:

Q. What am I working on?

A. I just crossed the 40K mark on Two to Tango, my M/M SF caper erotic romance prompted by a picture of John Barrowman tangoing with Misha Collins at a convention (this is what happens when you do things like that, jb). The plot: when dashing intergalactic art thief Rory “The Highlander” MacLellan accidentally kidnaps/rescues surly archaeologist Dmitri Grigoryev during a heist, neither of them expect the authorities to put out an arrest warrant on Dmitri as Rory’s inside man. On the run and with no choice but to work together, the two plan another heist, navigate a complicated family get-together, and fight their growing attraction. But will Dmitri’s own family secret derail what could be the start of a beautiful friendship?

The goal is to have this finished, edited and submitted by the end of this week, and so far it looks like I’m going to manage it. After that, I need to go back to work on book 2 in the Olympic Cove series, Breaker Zone, and my MMF historical erotic romance set in 1923 Weimar Republic-era Berlin, Behind the Iron Cross. Apparently people are getting impatient to see both of those, and I don’t like to leave readers hanging.

Q. How does my work differ from others of its genre?

There’s a heavy SF element in most of my work, simply because I started out as a science fiction writer (and still write it). As I recently commented to someone, my debut novel Storm Season is the only erotic romance novel I know of that contains Greek gods, bioengineering, nanotechnology, a paranormal battle sequence, and Alan Turing.

Q. Why do I write what I do?

Very simple — I write what I like to read. I deeply enjoyed Tymber Dalton’s Fierce Radiance and Tamora Bight series, Morgan Hawke’s Victorious Star and Laurann Dohner’s various series, and that’s what I shoot for when I write — a healthy blend of SF and erotic romance.

Q. How does your writing process work?

See above.

Seriously, I have an extreme lively imagination and a hyperactive Muse, so coming up with story ideas is rarely a problem. My current To Be Written queue contains 20 books at the moment, and the list just keeps getting longer every month. I often work on two or three books at the same time so that I can flip back and forth between them if I get stuck or feel stale on any one story. I try to hit a set word count every day, although Real Life and Ramón’s crazy work schedule sometimes interferes with that. One I finish a book, I put it aside to cool while I work on something else, then come back for edits when I can look at it with a clear eye. I go through at least two drafts (and sometimes three), and always give it a final polish when I get edits back from my publisher. I treat writing as a job — best damn job in the worl, mind you, but it’s something that has to be done every day, no excuses.

Q. Who will we meet next week?

Sorry, I didn’t tag anyone on this. But I fell confident that you’re going to find some amazing writers on the other blogger’s posts.

About nicolacameronwrites

Nicola Cameron has had some interesting adventures in her life -- ask her sometime about dressing up as Tietania, Queen of the Bondage Fairies. When not writing, she wrangles cats, makes dolls of dubious and questionable identity, and thanks almighty Cthulhu that she doesn’t have to work for a major telecommunications company any more (because there’s BDSM, and then there’s just plain torture...).

Posted on February 25, 2014, in Writing. Bookmark the permalink. 1 Comment.

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